Cookie Jar with Antiqued Mirror Finish

Craftsy

Who doesn’t love cookies?  We may all have a different favorite, but cookies are loved by most!  Like most of my projects, this cookie jar started it’s life as something else.  I felt the need to preserve it and make it pretty!  Adding an antiqued mirror finish to glass is really easy!  I think this would be a great project for Christmas gifts.  Most dollar stores have plenty of plain glass containers perfect for this technique.  Just add in a batch of your favorite cookies and a bow and presto – gift done!  Don’t you love easy gifts?  Ok, on with the tutorial!

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Supplies

The glass jar I’m using was a Christmas gift from my grandmother-in-law.  It was filled with chocolates when I received it – which are long gone!  I used some Goo Be Gone to take off the label and cleaned it with glass cleaner.  It’s the perfect size for a cookie jar!  Once you find a glass jar to use, here’s what else you’ll need:

  • Mirror Effect spray paint – This is a smaller can for the price, but it doesn’t take much for this effect.
  • spray bottle with 1/2 water and 1/2 white vinegar – I usually have a bottle with this in it for cleaning!
  • Chalkboard paint – This is optional for the label.  You could also use chalkboard labels.
  • Contact paper – This is only needed if you decide to use the chalkboard paint.

supplies

 

Antiqued Mirror Finish

This is so easy I want to do it to all my plain glass jars!  Just spray the vinegar water on the surface of the jar then spray the mirror paint over it.  I did mine in segments – spray vinegar water, spray mirror paint, turn, and repeat.  This stuff drys really quickly!

mirror-paint

All mirrored up!

all-mirrored-up

Next, take a soft cloth and wipe over the vinegar water spots.  Don’t rub too hard because it will take off the paint!

wipe-it-off2

Here’s a view of the top.

at-the-top

Now, I just need a label!

Making a Chalkboard Label

I have some peel and stick chalkboard labels, but they seemed too small for this jar.  So, I decided to make a template and paint one on!  I used a chipboard cut-out I had on hand and traced the outline on the contact paper.  Contact paper is great for making templates for smooth surfaces.

template

Once my template was ready, I placed it on the jar.  There’s a trick to getting this on without it sticking everywhere but where you want it!  Only peel the back off of one side.  Stick that side down and slowly pull the backing off as you press down the template.  This will help keep most of the bubbles out!  I added painter’s tape to protect a larger area from over-spray.  In hind sight, I would tape some paper over most of it and avoid putting the tape directly on the jar.  I have some lines from the tape on my jar, but I’m okay with that!

chalkboard-label

The instructions for the chalkboard paint call for two coats.  Then you have to “chalk” the surface and wipe clean to use.

labeling

Ready for Cookies!

Now I have a new home for my cookies!  I’m tempted to label it “vegetables” to keep my son away – hee, hee!

Cookie Jar with Antiqued Mirror Finish

This was my first time using mirror paint.  It does suggest to apply it to the back of what you’re spraying, but I didn’t want it on the side with my cookies.  I think I may need to apply a clear coat to keep it from rubbing off.  Time will tell!  Also, writing with chalk makes my teeth hurt!

Hope y’all have a wonderful Wednesday, see ya later sweet potater!

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